Armour And Defense Qualities

Armour Explanation

Armour is worn by characters, providing them with additional defense against attack. Armour comes in a wide variety of types; lighter types offer less protection, but greater mobility, whilst heavier types give excellent protection but severely hamper movement.

All armour offers AP. When a character wearing armour is attacked, they take the Armour Points (AP) of the location hit, subtract the attack's Penetration value (Pen), and add the remainder to their Toughness Bonus (TB). They then reduce the damage value of the attack by this much.

AP Values do not stack. If wearing multiple types of armour on the same location, you only ever use the highest AP value; the other AP values have no effect.

Armour is formatted in the following way:

Name Location Covered AP Agility Limit
Example Armour Body 1 90

Name: The name designating the type of armour.
Location Covered: Each piece of armour covers a different location. For example, a piece of armour that covers the Body will only add its AP to attacks that hit the Body, not the Head, Arms or Legs.
AP: The Armour Points value of this piece of armour.
Agility Limit: The maximum Agility a person equipped with this piece of armour is allowed to have. For example, a person with Agility 100 who equipped a piece of armour with an Agility Limit of 90 would treat their Agility as 90, not 100, for all intents and purposes. Some pieces of Armour do not have set limits; these pieces are represented by a '-x' format (eg -10). When equipping these pieces of armour, you find the lowest Agility Limit of all armour being worn, and reduce it by the value of x. For arm and leg armour, this penalty assumes you are wearing a pair to cover both arms or legs. If this is not the case, halve the penalty, rounding up to the nearest full number.

Armour Types

Combat Armour

Combat armour refers to armour that relies on a combination of thick fabrics, plastics and composites (such as Kevlar), often used in modern militaries. The main purpose of armour of this type is to shield wearers from shrapnel, the major killer on the battlefield. That said, it is less effective against direct hits from bullets or stabbing weapons. The armour is designed to emphasize protection on the main torso and vital organs.

Combat Armour is perfect for fighters who rely strongly on mobility for their defense. It allows them to retain high agility scores, and whilst the AP gains are small, but add solid defense against low-penetrative enemies.

There are no restrictions on wearing Flak Armour.

Name Location Covered AP Agility Limit
Combat Boots Legs 3 -
Combat Gauntlets Arms 3 -
Combat Helmet Head 2 -
Combat Vest Body 4 -

Scaled Armour

Scaled armour refers to a variety of armour types from history. Small plates of armour, resembling the scales of fish or other creatures, are banded together in large numbers, forming a coat of scales that repel blades and arrows. The materials include hard metals, leather, horn and others. For the purposes of this description, scaled armour also includes lamellar armour, including that of traditional Japanese armour.

Lamellar offers good protection. Most fighters can rely on at least a Lamellar cuirass without worrying about the Agility Limit.

Lamellar Brigandines can be worn by anyone. However, the cuisses, gauntlets and helmet may only be worn by people wearing the brigandine.

Name Location Covered AP Agility Limit
Lamellar Brigandine Body 6 60
Lamellar Rerebraces Arms 5 -5
Lamellar Cuisses Legs 5 -5
Lamellar Helmet Head 4 -

Link Armour

Link Armour refers to armour that relies on thousands of small links of metal (iron or steel, typically), linked to form a mesh. The most common and identifiable form of this is the chain mail of Europe and the Mediterranean, but other variations exist, such as the Japanese Tatami and Kusari, as well as the Lorica Hamata of ancient Rome. Link armour has proven to be incredibly resilient to blades (less so to blunt weapons); modern versions of link armour are used as anti-shark armour by divers.

Link armour is restrictive. That said, it offers excellent protection. A good strategy for characters with high agility but not excelling in pure agility is to wear a link hauberk and coif, and use combat armour for the limbs.

Link Hauberks can be worn by anyone. The Coif, Chausses and Mittens may only be worn by someone wearing the Hauberk, however.

Name Location Covered AP Agility Limit
Link Coif Head 6 -
Link Chausses Legs 7 -5
Link Hauberk Body 8 50
Link Mittens Arms 7 -5

Plate Armour

Plate armour refers to armour made of plates of sculpted metal (typically steel). A full 'harness' of plate armour would cover a warrior from head to toe, completely encasing them. Although used in limited forms around the world throughout history, the height of its use came in the late medieval and renaissance period. As a form of personal armour it was unparallelled against bladed weapons.

Plate armour is the most restrictive and, appropriately, the most protective armour. Even the basic Plate Cuirass is heavily restrictive.

Plate Cuirasses can be worn by anyone. The Helm, Gauntlets and Leggings may only be worn by someone wearing the Cuirass, however.

Name Location Covered AP Agility Limit
Plate Cuirass Body 10 40
Plate Helm Head 8 -
Plate Gauntlets Arms 9 -5
Plate Leggings Legs 9 -5

Shields

Shields are hand-held pieces of equipment designed to intercept attacks. They come in a wide variety of sizes, from small targes and bucklers to huge pavises. They are typically made of thick and hard wood, reinforced with metal or leather.

Shields operate differently to normal armour. In essence, they are a like a weapon that operates as armour. To this end, shields use different rules than armour worn.
First and foremost, shields must be wielded in a hand, like a weapon. Secondly, as shields are their profile is different as shown below:

Name Damage Locations Covered AP Bonus Agility Limit Parry Bonus
Example Shield 1d5I Equipped Arm 0 60 +20

Name: The name designating the type of shield.
Damage: Shields can be used as crude bashing weapons. Each shield thus has a damage code, but a Pen value of 0; furthermore, all attacks made with a shield take a -10 penalty to hit.
Locations Covered: The body part(s) covered. All shields cover the arm on which they are equipped, but larger shields cover multiple body parts.
AP Bonus: The Armour Points Bonus of this shield. Shields, unlike normal Armour, stack with worn armour- if you have AP 8 Arm armour, and you wear a shield with a +2 AP Bonus, then your arm AP total is AP 10.
Agility Limit: The maximum Agility a person equipped with this piece of armour is allowed to have. For example, a person with Agility 100 who equipped a piece of armour with an Agility Limit of 90 would treat their Agility as 90, not 100, for all intents and purposes. Some pieces of Armour do not have set limits; these pieces are represented by a '-x' format (eg -10).
Parry Bonus: All shields offer a Parry Bonus. When using the Parry skill, you may choose to parry the attack with the shield, adding the shield's Parry Bonus as a modifier to your test.

Shield Types

Light Shields

Light shields are the smallest and lightest shields. Often they are small and round and designed primarily for close hand-to-hand combat, where they are used to parry enemy weapons. Historical examples include the buckler and Scottish targe.

Light shields offer no additional AP, but have no restrictions or special bonuses.

Name Damage Locations Covered AP Bonus Agility Limit Parry Bonus
Light Shield 1d5-2I Equipped Arm 0 - +15

Medium Shields

Medium shields, like the kite, heater or pelta shield, cover a larger area and are thicker than light shields. This makes them useful in hand-to-hand combat, but also offers some assistance from ranged attacks.

Medium shields have a small AP bonus and reasonable Agility Limit that makes them .

Name Damage Locations Covered AP Bonus Agility Limit Parry Bonus
Medium Shield 1d5-1I Equipped Arm 2 60 +20

Heavy Shields

Heavy Shields, like the Roman Scutum or tower shield, are heavy, bulky and offer excellent defense. Their size and shape makes them good against projectile attacks.

Heavy Shields have a good AP bonus and cover the body as well; a high parry bonus but a poor Agility Limit. People wielding a Heavy Shield can parry ranged physical attacks; but instead of applying the Parry Bonus, in that situation they apply a -10 penalty instead.

Name Damage Locations Covered AP Bonus Agility Limit Parry Bonus
Heavy Shield 1d5I Equipped Arm, Body 4 40 +30
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