Federation Council Decisions

1: Uni- or Bicameral?

The first step is to decide whether the Federation Council will be unicameral- as in, consisting of a single chamber or house that passes all the laws- or bicameral- as in, consisting of two chambers or houses, with a lower house traditionally introducing and voting on laws, and the upper house reviewing and blocking them if necessary.
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Options

Unicameral

The Federation Council will consist of a single chamber.

Effects
Unicameral: All #2 Sub-Events are disabled. Skip directly to #3.
Disappointed: 15% Chance of France gaining 1 Dissatisfaction Token.

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Bicameral

The Federation Council will consist of a lower and upper chamber.

Effects
Bicameral: All #3 Sub-Events are disabled.
Disappointed: 15% Chance of Soviet Union gaining 1 Dissatisfaction Token.

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2A: Composition of the Lower House

One of the most important elements we need to consider is the makeup of the Lower House and how the members of the House are chosen.
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Options

Population-Based State Voting

Every member state receives 1 vote in the Lower House per million citizens, with a minimum of 1 vote per state. As a result, nations with larger populations have more power in the Federation. We estimate that at current populations, this would give 650 votes to the Chinese, 320 to the Soviets, 240 to the Americans, 230 to the French and 10 to the British. The Chinese would end up with 44% of the vote, ensuring that everyone bar the Chinese are upset… And the British infuriated.

Effects
Population Based: States are represented in the Lower House with a single representative who wields a number of votes depending on the population of their state. 1 million citizens = 1 vote.
Unhappy: 30% Chance of Soviet Union gaining 1 Disaffection Token.
Upset: 55% Chance of France gaining 1 Disaffection Token.
Upset: 55% Chance of USA gaining 1 Disaffection Token.
Infuriated: UK gains 1 Disaffection Token.

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Single-Member District First Past the Post

The Lower House represents a number of geographical districts, each district providing a single representative. Candidates compete within their district, with the candidate who wins the most votes gaining the seat. Because this system isn't shackled to government intents, it means populations might vote against their state's intent. However, the FPtP system distorts elections by funneling votes to the two or three most powerful candidates; furthermore, under circumstances its possible to create a system where representatives are elected despite a majority of voters having voted against them. The Soviets and the Chinese balk at this system as it gives voting rights to occupied states. The French dislike it because more than half of the population could be considered hostile to the government (the French hesitate to refer to them as 'occupied' since the territories are either integrated or going to be integrated into the French democracy), but also because they consider the system faulty and unrepresentative. The Americans are ambivalent, and the British hate that their population will still account for little.

Effects
First Past the Post: Federation states are divided into federal districts which each elect one representative. The candidate with the most votes wins.
Unhappy: 40% Chance of China gaining 1 Disaffection Token.
Upset: 55% Chance of France gaining 1 Disaffection Token.
Angry: 75% Chance of Soviet Union gaining 1 Disaffection Token.
Infuriated: UK gains 1 Disaffection Token.

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Multi-Member District Single Transferable Vote

The Lower House represents a number of (typically quite large) geographical districts, each district providing multiple representatives. Candidates compete within their district, with voters listing the candidates in order of preference. If no candidate receives a specific number of votes, then the least polled candidate is eliminated and that candidate's votes dispersed amongst the other candidates in order of preference. Once a candidate is elected, any surplus votes beyond the ones absolutely needed to elect them are then dispersed in order of preference to other candidates. This process continues until all seats in that have been filled. Larger geographical areas mean that candidates with support over broad areas to be more proportionate and thus permit the distribution of seats to be closer to the distribution of votes.

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