The Heilongjiang Incident

The Heilongjiang Incident

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"How could one misplaced bureaucrat do this much damage?"
-Premier Kuzmin

A diplomatic incident was triggered flooding of the Heilongjiang river changed the course of the river, pushing it sixty miles to the north. Prefect Han of Daxinganling Prefecture claimed that, according to the Treaty of Aigun, which established the Heilongjiang (Amur in Russian) river as the border between China and Russia, that the official borders of China and Russia had shifted appropriately. The Governor of Heilongjiang, Governor Dian, was part of the same political machine as the Prefect, and thus supported him, albeit reluctantly; to not do so risked his losing reelection in October.

The Soviet response was one of fury. Although mediators attempted to solve the crisis, even taking it to the highest powers in the Federation, various actions by those on the ground- particularly Prefect Han- helped to inflame the situation. The Prefect permitted police forces to patrol the area, drew up new plans for development and even tried to take a census of the region, even though it was still flood-stricken.

By the 23rd of July, Mikhail Kerensky, Governor of Amur Oblast- on whose territory Han was infringing- had had enough. He requested that military forces be deployed to the disputed territory. The Soviet Far East Military District permitted the deployment and sent 1,500 soldiers, supported by light vehicles and scout VTOLs into the area to take back control. Han foolishly ordered his police forces to resist, and although most did not, three police officers in a border city were discovered allegedly trying to steal Russian military equipment. They were shot and killed.

By now this had become a major flashpoint. Prefect Han called the deployment of military forces an act of war and instantly warned the Shenyang Military Regional Command of a Soviet incursion. The Shenyang Command deployed a regiment of mechanised infantry in response. Although perhaps intended as a deterrent, the perfect mix of misinformation, flooded infrastructure and nationalist tensions sparked something greater. by 1 PM of the 24th of July, Chinese and Soviet forces were engaged in combat. By 6 AM on the 25th, the Soviets had withdrawn across the river. Roughly 210 Soviet soldiers lay dead, along with another 165 Chinese. Chinese news referred to this as the 'Heilongjiang Incident'; Soviet outlets referred to it as the 'Manchurian Backstab'.

Both the Chinese and Soviet governments are now apoplectic with rage, leading to large-scale mobilisations of regional forces to the area. It is estimated by the 30th of July, roughly 40,000 soldiers combined will be facing off across the Heilongjiang river. Both sides are demanding that the other back off, pay reparations and recognize the other's territorial rights. The Soviets are also demanding that Prefect Han be arrested and tried in the Federation Supreme Court, which has become a sticking point for China, as they refuse to let the Soviets dictate the fate of an elected official. They have turned to the Federation for arbitration.

The Federation now has the power to rule in one way or another… At the risk of tempting local anger.

Chosen Option: Rule for the Soviets

The Soviets are in the right. The Chinese have literally overstepped their boundaries with this stupidity. Borders will be restored to as they were before the floods, Prefect Han will be placed on trial and the Chinese Government will pay reparations for the dead Soviet soldiers.

Soviets Satisfied. All Federation leaders gain the Peer (Soviets, 1) talent.
Amiable Soviets. The Soviets will gain one Satisfaction Mark, which influences future events.
Chinese Rage. Safe; no leaders gain the Enemy (Chinese Federation, 1) talent.
Chinese Dissatisfaction. The Chinese will gain one Dissatisfaction Mark, which influences future events.
Trial of Prefect Han. The Trial of Prefect Han event will fire in Turn 6.

Options

Rule for the Soviets

The Soviets are in the right. The Chinese have literally overstepped their boundaries with this stupidity. Borders will be restored to as they were before the floods, Prefect Han will be placed on trial and the Chinese Government will pay reparations for the dead Soviet soldiers.

Soviets Satisfied. All Federation leaders have a 65% chance of gaining the Peer (Soviets, 1) talent.
Amiable Soviets. The Soviets will gain one Satisfaction Mark, which influences future events.
Chinese Rage. All Federation leaders, except Liu Lin, have a 50% chance of gaining the Enemy (Chinese Federation, 1) talent.
Chinese Dissatisfaction. The Chinese will gain one Dissatisfaction Mark, which influences future events.
Trial of Prefect Han. The Trial of Prefect Han event will fire in Turn 6.

Rule for the Chinese

It was a reasonable interpretation of the treaty. More to the point, Russia's reaction with military forces before mediation could finish was a severe overreaction. The territory south of the river is now part of China, and the Soviet Union will pay reparations for the dead Chinese soldiers.

Chinese Satisfied. All Federation leaders have a 65% chance of gaining the Peer (Chinese, 1) talent.
Friends with Beijing. The Chinese will gain one Satisfaction Mark, which influences future events.
Soviets Simmering. All Federation leaders have a 50% chance of gaining the Enemy (Soviets, 1) talent.
Yet Another Federation Betrayal! The Soviets will gain one Dissatisfaction Mark, which influences future events.

Pay reparations on behalf of both sides and rule status quo ante bellum

The Federation will pay for all reparations, and furthermore rules that the situation is to be resolved as 'status quo ante bellum', restoring the border to its geographical exactness before the incident. Prefect Han will not be tried.

Reparations. Federation pays 2 CP.
But we wanted Prefect Han tried! 20% chance that the Soviets gain one Dissatisfaction Mark, which influences future events.
But the treaty says…! 20% chance that the Chinese gain one Dissatisfaction Mark, which influences future events.
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