Vehicle Rules

Vehicle Crew

Unless piloted remotely or self-piloted, vehicles have the capacity to hold a number of crew inside itself. When a character used the Embark action on a vehicle, that character is treated as being embarked within the vehicle.

Vehicle crew are classified as one of two categories: an Operator or a Passenger. Operators are the one controlling the vehicle's primary systems such as the command interface. Passengers ride in the vehicle, and can crew a vehicle's auxiliary systems such as weapons, scanners or the like. Every vehicle lists how many crew it can carry on its profile. Only the Operator can take vehicle actions marked with the 'Operate' type.

Crew in a vehicle retain their normal initiatives and actions and still act on their own initiatives. The vehicle does not have a single initiative of its own.
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Vehicle Actions

ACTIONS
Name Type or Subname Action Test Description
Attack Actions
Attack Action with Vehicle Weapon Varies Varies WS or BS You perform an Attack Action as per normal, using one of the vehicle's weapons. Follow all the rules as standard for that attack action. If the vehicle moved its Tactical Speed or more in the previous round, it takes a -10 penalty to hit with ranged weapons; if it moved twice or move its Tactical Speed in the previous round it takes a -20 penalty instead. Weapons require you to be manning that weapon's position. Some weapons are linked to the primary controls and so the Operator can use them as well. No weapon can be used more than once per round. Some attacks behave differently in vehicles; see below.
- Melee Attacks Varies WS Some vehicles may make Melee Attacks. These execute as above. Vehicles with Melee Weapons add the values of their Size and Strength traits to the damage done by Melee Weapons.
- Charge Full Action WS This action requires a vehicle that is a Walker. You move up to your Tactical Speed toward an enemy; the last 4m to the target must be in a straight line. Once you reach your target, you make a single melee attack by taking a WS test with a +10 bonus; on a success, you score one hit. This action ignores penalties to the attack due to moving Tactical Speed or more.
Hit and Run Attack, Melee, Operator Full Action Weapon Skill This action requires a vehicle that is Open-Topped and can only carry the operator and at max one passenger. Walkers cannot use this action. The vehicle moves a number of metres up to its Tactical Speed in one of its movement vectors. Generally, a vehicle must move its own length before it can make a single 90 degree turn. It may turn more than once, providing it moves a sufficient distance each time. At the end of this movement, providing the vehicle is in range of an appropriate enemy, you may make a WS-10 test. If the test is successful, you score a single hit with an appropriate melee weapon. No other combat actions (such as Lightning Attack) may be combined with this action. Once the attack has been resolved, you may choose to stay in melee combat, or may make a second move away from the target. The vehicle moves a number of metres up to its Tactical Speed in one of its movement vectors. Generally, a vehicle must move its own length before it can make a single 90 degree turn. It may turn more than once, providing it moves a sufficient distance each time. The enemy does not get a free attack of opportunity against you- there simply isn't time. If the WS test fails by 5 degrees or more, the vehicle becomes Out of Control.
Operator Actions
Evasive Maneuvers Operator, Movement Full Action Operate The vehicle moves a number of metres up to its Tactical Speed. Generally, a vehicle must move its own length before it can make a single 90 degree turn. It may turn more than once, providing it moves a sufficient distance each time. After this, you make an Operate+0 test. On a success, and for every additional degree of success, the vehicle imposes a -10 penalty on all attacks against it until the beginning of your next turn. Any shooting the vehicle performs during this turn suffers the same penalty in addition to the usual penalties for movement. On a failure, the vehicle moves up to double its Tactical Speed; for every degree of success, you or anyone else trying to operate the vehicle take a -5 penalty to any Operate tests made next turn. If you fail the test by 5 degrees or more, the vehicle becomes Out of Control. Walkers do not suffer Out of Control but instead topple over.
Floor It! Operator, Movement Full Action Operate-10 You make an Operate-10 test. On a success, the vehicle moves up to double its Tactical Speed, plus an additional 5m per degree of success on the test. Attacks against the vehicle take a -20 penalty until the start of your next turn, and attacks from the vehicle take the same penalty. On a failure, the vehicle moves up to double its Tactical Speed; for every degree of success, you or anyone else trying to operate the vehicle take a -5 penalty to any Operate tests made next turn. If you fail the test by 5 degrees of failure or more, the vehicle goes Out of Control.
Full Speed Operator, Movement Full Action - The vehicle moves a number of metres up to twice its Tactical Speed in one of its movement vectors. Generally, a vehicle must move its own length before it can make a single 90 degree turn. It may turn more than once, providing it moves a sufficient distance each time.
Jink Operator, Movement Reaction Operate The vehicle is attacked and you move to evade the attack. This action may only be taken if the vehicle moved at least its Tactical Speed last turn. You must be aware of the incoming attack and cannot be Surprised. You make an Operate test, with a penalty equal to the size modifier to hit the vehicle (ie. a vehicle which grants +20 bonuses to hit due to size takes a -20 penalty to jinking). On a success the vehicle avoids one shot from a single source, with extra shots avoided per degree of success like a usual Dodge test. When jinking attacks from Hordes, you take a -5 penalty per squad; on a success, however, you negate the entire attack. If you fail the test by 5 degrees or more, the vehicle becomes Out of Control. Walkers do not suffer Out of Control but instead topple over.
Parry Operator, Melee Reaction Parry After you are hit with a Melee attack but before damage or effects are rolled, then you may make a Parry test. You must be aware of the attack in order to make the test (and thus cannot be surprised). On a success, you negate the attack. If the attack is a multi-hit attack (eg: swift or lightning), then a success negates a single hit, and negates an extra hit per degree of success. When parrying melee attacks from Hordes, you take a -5 penalty per squad; on a success, however, you negate the entire attack.
Ram Operator, Movement Full Action Operate Non-Walkers only. The vehicle moves up to twice its Tactical Speed. Generally, a vehicle must move its own length before it can make a single 90 degree turn. It may turn more than once, providing it moves a sufficient distance each time. As part of this movement you must make an Operate test with a bonus equal to the to-hit bonus a vehicle grants due to size. On a success, the vehicle collides into an object at the end of the move, dealing 1d10 impact damage, plus an additional amount of damage equal to half the vehicle's AP on the facing that struck the target. For every 10m the vehicle moved in excess of its Tactical Speed, it deals an extra 1d10 damage, to a maximum of 1d10 per size above Average. For every point of damage after soak a Vehicle inflicts via ramming, the target is moved back 1 metre. This attack may not be parried, but it can be dodged. If the target is struck, but deflects the attack through an AT Field, it is still moved a number of metres equal to the damage it would have suffered, reduced by ATS. If the vehicle collides with another vehicle (or something else of suitable size and density), the ramming vehicle also suffers damage equal to half the AP of the facing of the vehicle/object it struck, plus 1d5 damage. On a failure, the vehicle misses its target. If the target was a large object such as a vehicle or a wall, then it still hits, but the final damage done to the vehicle/object before soak is halved.
Steer Operator, Movement Half Action - The vehicle moves a number of metres up to its Tactical Speed in one of its movement vectors. Generally, a vehicle must move its own length before it can make a single 90 degree turn. It may turn more than once, providing it moves a sufficient distance each time.
Miscellaneous Actions
Embark/Disembark Movement Half Action - You either enter the vehicle, exit the vehicle, switches positions to a different system in the vehicle or in some way.
- Disembark from moving vehicle Half Action Agility; Acrobatics+20 If trying to disembark from a vehicle in motion, you must Agility or Acrobatics+20, with a penalty to the test equal to the number of metres the vehicle has moved in its turn. On a success, you achieve your goal safely, whilst on a failure you tumble out of the vehicle gracelessly. You are knocked prone and suffer Impact damage equal to the degrees of failure multiplied by two, applied to a random body part.
- Embark to moving vehicle Half Action Agility; Acrobatics+20 If trying to embark to a vehicle in motion, you must Agility or Acrobatics+20, with a penalty to the test equal to the number of metres the vehicle has moved in its turn. On a success, you achieve your goal safely, whilst on a failure you bounce off the vehicle. You are knocked prone and suffer Impact damage equal to the degrees of failure multiplied by two, applied to a random body part. If the vehicle you are attempting to embark already has an occupant.

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Vehicle General Actions

In addition to the actions specifically meant for manipulating vehicles, a character can also perform many actions when embarked in a vehicle.
• The character can perform the overhaul or patch breach uses of the Tech-Use skill to attempt to repair breaches that the vehicle has suffered.
• The character can make attacks against targets within their of sight as normal (note that unless a vehicle has the Open-Topped trait, the passengers do not normally have line of sight to anyone outside of the vehicle).
• The character can use Evasion reactions to avoid attacks that target them (but not to attacks that target the vehicle itself).
• The character can take other appropriate actions (including most actions without the Movement type) while embarked a vehicle as the Game Master sees fit, such as issuing commands.

Vehicle Movement

Vehicles can often move quickly and in various ways. What follows lists the various ways and hows vehicles move.

Movement Vectors

Vehicle movement direction is divided into four categories- Forward, Rear, Side and Vertical. Vehicle profiles list the vehicle's movement rate in each of these arcs.

Vehicles which have a 0 or lower in a movement vector cannot move in that direction.

VehicleArc_zps7df08523.png

Forward

The direction the vehicle is facing, represented by a a 90-degree arc in front of the vehicle. Most vehicles possess this vector.

Rear

The direction backwards of the vehicle, represented by a 90-degree arc behind the vehicle. Most ground vehicles possess this arc, whilst many fixed-wing aerial vehicles do not.

Side

The direction to each side of the vehicle, represented by two 90-degree arcs to the left and to the right of the vehicle. Hovercraft, walker vehicles and some space and aircraft possess this vector.

Vertical

The above or below the vehicle. Depending on the vehicle, moving vertically may be a movement action by itself, or made freely as part of another action, eg. An aircraft making a normal forward movement may also adjust their height up to an amount listed on the vehicle profile. This is mostly the domain of hovercraft, aircraft and spacecraft.

Turning a Vehicle

Generally, a vehicle must move its own length before it can make a single 90 degree turn. It may turn more than once, providing it moves a sufficient distance each time.

Maneuverability

All vehicles have a Maneuverability modifier, to demonstrate the ease or difficulty with which the vehicle is controlled. When the vehicle's operator makes a test for an action with the Operate type, they apply the Maneuverability modifier to their test as well as all the other appropriate modifiers.

Difficult Terrain

When making a test for an action with the Operate type in difficult terrain, the operator applies a Difficult Terrain penalty to his test.

When maneuvering in difficult terrain, if the operator fails an action with the Operate type by three degrees of failure or more, the vehicle immediately suffers a Crash (outlined below). For the purposes of the crash the vehicle takes damage as though it had collided with an object of a Size trait equal to the number of degrees of failure by which the operator failed the test.

Vehicle Combat

Attacking Passengers

Passengers of a vehicle can be selected and attacked as normal, so long as line of sight can be drawn to the target. Do note that for vehicles, this often means that the passenger is not in line of sight unless manning an external weapon or the vehicle has the Open Topped trait. Attacks made against passengers, regardless, take the usual penalties to hit.

Attacking Vehicles

Attacking vehicles is different to attacking people, since vehicles are often larger and more heavily armoured as well as being mechanical constructs. The rules are below.

Vehicle Facing

When attacking a vehicle, the first course of action is to determine the Facing- ie the side of the vehicle- that the attack will hit. All vehicles have four Facings- a Front, a Rear, and two Sides (Left and Right). Each facing has its own Armour Rating and each corresponds to a roughly 90 degree angle.

VehicleArc_zps7df08523.png

Once the Facing has been determined, the attack roll is made. Attacks made from above or below the vehicle count as Rear hits.

Attack Roll

Attack rolls to hit a vehicle are made in the same way as other attacks. Vehicles often are larger than people, and so often have a corresponding Size bonus to hit. Furthermore, attacks made against a vehicle take a penalty equal to the amount of metres the vehicle has moved this round.

Determine Hit Locations

If an attack has hit, the attacker must now determine the Hit Location. This is different from Facing; whilst Facing is about the vehicle's Armour, the Hit Location is about the vehicle's actual components.

Every vehicle has three components: The hull, the motive systems and the weapons. The attacker takes the 'ones' digit of his attack roll and compares it to the following chart. For multiple attacks, such as from a Full Auto, the attacker rolls a 1d10 for every attack instead.

Digit Hit Location
1-5 Hull
6-8 Motive Systems
9-10 Weapons

The hull represents a vehicle's main body and chassis, containing the main controls, power plant (if powered) and the passengers. Motive systems represents the system by which the vehicle moves- wheels, legs, jets. Weapons represent the vehicle's weaponry. If a vehicle does not possess a particular component (ie no weapons or destroyed motive systems), count all hits on that location as hits to the Hull.

The Motive and Weapons hit locations have an 'Armor Value Penalty'. This means that whatever the Hull AP for that Facing is, the Motive or Weapons locations are treated as having the same AP, but with a reduction. For example, a Motive System with a Front AP Penalty of -2 would treat a Hull AP rating of 26 as 24.

If a vehicle possesses multiple weapons, apply a hit to the Weapons to a single specific Weapon system of the attacker's choice.

Attack Results

Breaches

After the attacker has rolled damage, compare the damage to the vehicle's appropriate AP, reducing the AP by Penetration as appropriate. If the damage is greater than zero, the hit has caused the Hit Location to gain a single Breach. If the attack is both greater than zero and a confirmed Righteous Fury, the attack does not deal an extra 1d10 of damage, but causes a Critical Breach instead.

Apply Breach effects

If a hit inflicts a new breach on a vehicle, it also applies a Breach Effect. To determine the effect, the attacker takes the total damage dealt by the attack (after reduction due to defense) and adds modifiers for any Breaches the vehicle is already suffering on the same Hit Location.
Every Breach adds a +5 to the result.
Every Critical Breach adds a +10 to the result.

Once the modifiers from (Critical) Breaches have been applied to damage, consult one of the charts below, depending on the Hit Location of the vehicle.

Vehicle Hull Effect Chart
Vehicle Motive Systems Effect Chart
Vehicle Weapons Effect Chart

Conditions

Many damage effects or specific weapons inflict conditions on a vehicle, causing it to act in dangerous or uncontrollable ways.
If a condition is incurred by an action or a weapon, the effect always applies even if the vehicle suffered no damage from the attack.
If a weapon quality or attack would inflict a condition that affects a characteristic or requires a characteristic test that the vehicle does not have (such as Snare or Toxin), the vehicle is unaffected by the attack.

Crashing (Skimmers, Flyers)

Skimmers and Flyers crash instead of going out of control.

If a Flyer or Skimmer is within 10 metres of the ground, it suffers the following effects:
Slow Crashing: If the distance the Skimmer moved (or was attempting to move) during that turn was as equal to its Tactical Speed or less, it moves half the distance it was attempting to travel in its current direction. It then comes to a complete stop. The Vehicle takes 1d5 hull damage which ignores AP. Anything it strikes suffers a single hit as if it had performed a Ram action on it, and the vehicle suffers the consequences of that action.
Fast Crashing: If the distance the Skimmer moved (or was attempting to move) is greater than its Tactical Speed, it travels a number of metres equal to its Tactical Speed in a direction determined by the GM, then swerves 1d10 metres in a random direction before crashing to a complete stop. The Vehicle takes 1d10 hull damage which ignores AP. Anything it strikes suffers a single hit as if it had performed a Ram action on it, and the vehicle suffers the consequences of that action. The Vehicle also may roll on impact; roll a 1d10. On a result of 6 or higher it rolls onto its roof (or cartwheels), and instantly adds +5 damage onto the 1d10 hull damage roll. If the vehicle survives, it cannot be used again until repaired.

If a Flyer or Skimmer is 10 metres or higher off the ground, then it suffers the following, far more terrifying effects:
AAAAAAAAAH: The pilot has time to make a single Operate-30 test. If he succeeds, the vehicle crash-lands. The vehicle is destroyed, and anyone inside suffers 2d10 Impact damage ignoring Armour, and is Stunned for a number of rounds equal to the damage he suffered (after reduction for Toughness bonus). If he fails the test, the vehicle ploughs into
the ground and explodes, as per the 29+ result on the Hull Damage table. Individuals can bail out at the last second according to the rules, although they count as falling from whatever altitude the vehicle was at the turn before it Crashed.

Falling Over (Walkers)

Walkers fall over instead of going out of control.
Falling Over: Roll on the Scatter Diagram to determine in which direction the Walker falls; this determines what Facing the vehicle lands on as well. The vehicle takes 1d10 damage to that Facing which ignores AP and hits a random Hit Location.
Dangerous Falls: If the vehicle falls a dangerous distance, it suffers 1d10 damage to the Facing, +1 per metre fallen, to that Facing which ignores AP and hits a random Hit Location.
Falling Concussion: All Crew and Passengers must test Toughness or be Stunned for 1 round.
Standing Up: The Walker may stand as a Full, assuming its motive systems are still functioning.

On Fire

The vehicle is ignited and begins to burn, threatening to engulf the interior with smoke and flame.
End of Round: At the end of each round, roll a 1d10. On a roll of 10, then something explosive is destroyed messily, causing 1d10 damage to the vehicle's Hull that ignores AP. For each turn the vehicle spends being consecutively on fire, the result needed for an explosion drops by 1, ie. at the end of the 2nd round of it being on fire, something explodes on a roll of 9-10.
Constant Penalty: Everyone in a burning vehicle takes a -20 penalty to all tests so long as the vehicle burns.
Putting it Out: At the start of any crewmember or passenger's turn, he can attempt to put out the fire. This is an Agility-20 (the -20 comes from the Constant Penalty above) test, although it may be modified to be easier or harder depending on circumstances: for example, putting out a vehicle fire is much easier in the pouring rain than it is in the open desert.
Crew on Fire: Under certain circumstances, a crewmember may be set on fire. Flaming crewmembers follow the same rules for fire and fire damage as they would on foot. At the start of every round, however, roll a 1d10 for every flaming crewmember in a vehicle. On a roll of 10, the vehicle also catches on fire.
Fire Damage: Any vehicle which has spent any amount of time on fire suffers a -10 penalty to all operate tests associated with it until it is repaired.

Stalled (X)

The vehicle is stuck or moving at a reduced pace.
Immediate Effect: A vehicle with the Stalled condition has the number of metres it can move in all movement vectors reduced by the value of X (to a minimum of 0). If a vehicle has a 0 in any movement vector it cannot move in that vector.
Stacking Stalled: A vehicle can only be suffering from a single instance of Stalled at any one time. If a second instance of Stalled is inflicted on a vehicle that is already Stalled, add the values of X together to form a single value.
Getting it Going: A character embarked or within three metres of a stalled vehicle can spend a Full Action and make a Tech Use test. On a success, the value of X is reduced by 1, plus an extra per degree of success.

Out of Control

The vehicle is no longer under the operator's control, making it move in volatile ways.
Random Movement: The vehicle must move on its round, moving in a random direction. The direction it moves in is chosen by rolling a 1d10 and comparing to the chart below. The vehicle moves its Tactical Speed plus 1d10m in that direction. Anything it strikes suffers a single hit as though it were the target of a Ram action. The vehicle suffers the consequences of this as normal.
Walkers Fall Over: Walkers who suffer this effect Fall Over instead, as detailed above.
Ramming Concussion: If the vehicle collides with another object in this way, the crew and passengers must make a Toughness test or be stunned for 1 round.
Direction Chart
Roll Direction
1-4 45 degrees to the vehicle's left.
5-6 Directly ahead.
7-10 45 degrees to the vehicle's right.

Repairing Vehicles

Vehicle repair comes in two types- quick damage-control style Patch Breach actions, and long-term Repair actions. Both require the Tech-Use Skill.

Patch Breach

Time: 2 Full Actions
Skill Test: Tech Use
The character must be embarked or adjacent to the vehicle. The character spends two full actions on the vehicle, and then tests Tech Use. On a success, he can remove a single Breach, or reduce a Critical Breach to a normal Breach. This does not remove any effects incurred by the Breach unless specified on the effect when it is applied in the first place.
If Patch Breach fails, it cannot be reattempted on the same Breach; that Breach can only be repaired through long-term repair.

Repair

Time: Varies
Skill Test: Tech Use
The character must be embarked or adjacent to the vehicle. The amount of time it takes to repair depends on the vehicle in question and the damage it has sustained. Generally speaking, repairing a Breach requires one hour, and repairing a Critical Breach requires two hours, multiplied by the size category of the vehicle- so a Size Two (Enormous) Vehicle would require two hours to repair a normal Breach, whilst both a Size One (Hulking) and Size Zero (Average) Vehicle both only take the normal one hour.
A character repairing a vehicle makes a Tech Use test for every Breach the vehicle has, with a -10 penalty for Critical Breaches. On a success, the breach is repaired in the usual time, and every extra degree of success will reduce this time by 10% (rounded up).
On a failure, the test can be re-attempted on that Breach, but the time it takes to repair is doubled. If a repair Tech-Use test fails by a number of Degrees of Failure higher than the character's Intelligence bonus, the character has inadvertently worsened the damage and could even render the vehicle irreparable.

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