War Crimes In Ukraine

War Crimes in Ukraine

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"The conquered mourns, the conqueror is undone."
-Latin Proverb

A war crime is an act perpetrated by military forces that violates the Law of War, set out in agreements such as the Geneva and Hague Conventions. Often but not always conducted by soldiers against civilian populations, it includes acts such as summary executions, looting, rape, purges, massacres, refusal to take prisoners, abuse of prisoners, taking civilians hostage, perfidy (the pretense of acting in good faith with the intent to betray the other; for example, feigning surrender) and the use of child soldiers. Although most nations are full parties to the 'Laws of War', violations are common in just about every military conflict, whether by individual soldiers, larger regiments or even as government policy. Unfortunately, prosecution of war crimes falls far short of the rate of perpetration; victors will often thoroughly try their enemies as war criminals, but often make exceptions or allowances for their own actions.

Ukraine has been a turbulent region, ever since it was conquered by the Soviet Union shortly after Second Impact. Although most of the country has since been pacified- if not tamed- resistance has stubbornly continued in some of the more remote regions. In truth, the Soviet Union is deeply unpopular in Ukraine and the vast majority of the population desire independence. Because of this, Ukrainian civilians have been highly willing to act as partisans, supporting the UN advance through Ukraine. In fact in many cities in western Ukraine, wild pro-UN rallies have been held, followed by such a swell of new volunteers that whole divisions have been formed made up entirely of passionate Ukrainians.

Most of the attacks against Soviet forces comes from Ukrainian guerrilla partisans, however, attacking supply convoys, disrupting patrols and bombing installations. In the aftermath of one such attack, elements of the Soviet 64th Mechanised were ambushed on the way to the front line in Kiev. This greatly slowed the division and made it vulnerable to a precision strike from UN air units, causing massive havoc.

Informants within the Soviet Commissariat have informed us that in the aftermath of this, Soviet forces 'traced' the partisans back to a village. After forcing the population out into the streets, they demanded to know where the partisans had come from and were hiding. When no information was forthcoming, they accused the villagers of harbouring the partisans; they opened fire, massacred the population and, after looting it, torched the village. If this were not bad enough, the Commissariat's investigations suggest that the village legitimately had nothing to do with the partisans, and were in fact a rare village that supported the USSR. Naturally, if this were to come to light, it could cause massive problems for the Soviet Army in Ukraine, leading to an alienation of the parts that actually support the USSR. The Commissariat has thus decided to take no action against the perpetrators and to hide any evidence. However, should news of this be made public, then the backlash could be even more severe.

We thus have several options. We can of course sit by and permit this. Alternatively we could apply diplomatic pressure to the USSR, which is likely to result in this case being tried, but will lead to no institutional change. Finally, we could publicise it, drag the perps out and try them in a Federation court before attaching dedicated Federation investigators to all army units in an attempt to stop this from happening again. Such action would likely vastly reduce the instance and fallout of future war crimes, but is likely to be taken with extreme disgust by the Soviet Union.

Chosen Option: Try the Perps in a Federation Court and force institutional change

We cannot let thugs and murderers blacken the Federation Armed Forces. It is time that we exerted our authority over our member states and stopped this from happening again.

Institutional Change. Fewer war crime events in the future, and when they do occur, their outcomes will be more favourable.
Cost of Investigation Squads. Pay 1 CP this turn.
Yet another Federation Betrayal! The Soviet Union gains a Dissatisfaction Mark. Did not gain a second.
Enraged. All Federation Leaders gain the enemy (Soviets, 2) talent..
Justice. All Federation Leaders gain the peer (Ukrainians, 1) talent.

Options

Try the Perps in a Federation Court and force institutional change

We cannot let thugs and murderers blacken the Federation Armed Forces. It is time that we exerted our authority over our member states and stopped this from happening again.

Institutional Change. Fewer war crime events in the future, and when they do occur, their outcomes will be more favourable.
Cost of Investigation Squads. Pay 1 CP this turn.
Yet another Federation Betrayal! The Soviet Union gains a Dissatisfaction Mark, and has a 50% chance of gaining two.
Enraged. All Federation Leaders gain the enemy (Soviets, 1) talent, and have a 50% chance of gaining enemy (Soviets, 2) instead. Roll once for all leaders.
Justice. All Federation Leaders gain the peer (Ukrainians, 1) talent.

Apply Pressure on the Soviet Commissariat

With a bit of honeyed words, diplomatic haughtiness and perhaps some well-placed blackmail we can apply pressure on the Commissariat, forcing it to prosecute the case.

Meddling fools! 35% chance of the Soviet Union gaining a Dissatisfaction Mark.
Justice. 50% chance of all Federation Leaders gaining the peer (Ukrainians, 1) talent.

Do Nothing

What can we do? As bad as it is, we can't afford to alienate such a powerful ally.

Revelation of War Crimes. 50% chance that the event 'Soviet War Crimes Revealed' fires in Turn 6.

Help hide the crimes

As much as it might leave a bad taste in the mouth, the Soviets and us are on the same leaky ship. If we don't help them plug a leak, then we'll all sink.

Coverup. Pay 1 CP this turn.
Revelation of War Crimes. 25% chance that the event 'Federation Involvement in Soviet War Crime Revealed' fires in Turn 6.
Soviets Satisfied. The Soviet Union gains a Satisfaction Mark.
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